Parc Güell

Barcelona, Spain

I visit one of the most famous parks in the world, and see the fantasy-like structures designed by Antoní Gaudí.

Park Güell, a garden complex with peculiar and whimsical architectural structures scattered throughout the vast hills. Ceramics and mosaics give this park an enchanting glow.

This park is considered to be one of Barcelona’s most prized masterpieces, alongside Sagrada Familia.

The landscape is shocingly surreal, and stepping onto the grounds feels like stepping into a movie (If that movie was Alice in Wonderland meets Indiana Jones).

The Center of Parc Güell

The Center of Parc Güell

Some structures were covered in colorful pieces of stone and glass, which shone in the sun in magnificent sparkles. Other structures looked similar to eroding Malasian temples, with natural-looking stones spinning up their sides.

A stone walkway that also serves as a shade structure

A stone walkway that also serves as a shade structure

Stone walkway encompassing a stretch of flowers

Stone walkway encompassing a stretch of flowers

Sharp, hard lines similar to Sagrada Familia

Sharp, hard lines similar to Sagrada Familia

This walkway was especially impressive, bordering tropical gardens in a half circle. Many musicians performed under its shade, adding a musical element to the chirping birds, wind-rustled branches, and humming crowd.

Foliage surrounding structures

Foliage surrounding structures

The plants themselves held a unruly whild beauty. They spilled over onto walkways and scattered dappled light onto the mosaics.

House of Gaudí

House of Gaudí

Near the edge of the park was Gaudi’s house, now home to a museum. Behind this were beautiful views of the sprawling city of Barcelona. The house had vibrant stained glass windows and candyland-esque towers.

The edge of the park

The edge of the park

Sala Hipostila

Sala Hipostila (picture at top) refers to the giant stone and marble structure that was designed by Gaudi to be home to a marketplace. This structure is probably the busiest portion of the park. Imposing columns hold up an overlook with views of the park, Gaudi’s house, and Barcelona in the background. Along the edge of the roof is the world’s longest bench, which is completely covered in a non-repeating mosaic.

On the roof, the world's longest bench

On the roof, the world’s longest bench

Gaudi's bench

Gaudi’s bench

The staircase leading up to this stone awning is home to an iconic Catalonian figure: the Gaudi Gecko.

The Gecko Statue

The Gecko Statue

The gecko was the most crowded spot, and people were fighting their way to take pictures with it.

Under the Gaudi-canopy, you can glance up at the intricate mosaics on the ceiling. The shade is a well-needed respite from the hot sun.

Network of Collumns of

Network of Collumns of Sala Hipostila

The inside of the structure was surprisingly devoid of crowds, and we enjoyed strolling in the cool shade, looking up at the mosaics.

Ceiling Mosaic

Ceiling Mosaic

We also saw some more performers

Balance act

Balance act

Parc Güell is one of those landmarks that you just aren’t allowed to skip when visiting Barcelona. As much as you may hate tourist traps, you won’t be dissapointed with Gaudi’s masterpiece. I only wish I could have spent more hours roaming these fantastical grounds.

Parc Güell scenery

Parc Güell scenery

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