The Louvre

France, Paris

My trip to The Louvre in Paris. Photos, stories, and bucket list successes.

Summer 2012

Do you ever wonder about the lives of all the people in the back of your photos? I sure do. I hope all the people behind me in that picture are doing well.

Louvre Courtyard

Louvre Courtyard

The Louvre was our first big stop when we arrived in Paris.

When we got to the courtyard, it was the first time any of us had set eyes on the Eiffel tower. We could see it just barely peaking up from above the buildings. We started taking pictures, even though it wasn’t the best view. It was terribly exciting.

The Eiffel Tower from the Lourve

The Eiffel Tower from the Lourve

But that’s for another day. This was our chance to explore the Louvre. With almost 10 million visitors a year, it is the world most popular museum.

One of the many spectacular ceilings in the Louvre

One of the many spectacular ceilings in the Louvre

From below the Pyramids

From below the Pyramids

Now, The Lourve is huge. The grounds cover 632,500 feet. There are over 35,000 works of art and artifacts. If you looked at each piece of art for only a minute, it would take you 64 full days to cover everything. This article has a bunch of other similar fun facts.

Louvre court yard

Louvre court yard

All things considered, we were given virtually no time to explore everything. I don’t remember our exact time frame, but I would say that it was less than two hours.

A room in the Louvre, seen from the baggage check

A room in the Louvre, seen from the baggage check

Running through the Louvre

Running through the Louvre

Eugene Delacroix's, "La Liberté Guidant le Peuple."

Eugene Delacroix’s, “La Liberté Guidant le Peuple.”

We practically sprinted through the museum. In fact, we did run at some points. There were signs warning us not to touch paintings but no signs warning us against running. We wanted to see as much as possible.

Cavernous corridoors of the Louvre

Cavernous corridoors of the Louvre

The Great Sphinx of Tanis, circa 2600 BC

The Great Sphinx of Tanis, circa 2600 BC

That being said, I didn’t really take very many pictures.

paintings seen in the Louvre

paintings seen in the Louvre

My logic was, every single piece of artwork has pictures already available online. I couldn’t really add new perspectives, and it was a bit too crowded to pose in front of anything.

Winged Victory of Samonthrace, circa 200-180 BC

Winged Victory of Samonthrace, circa 200-180 BC

By the way, I should mention: Europeans are waaay more relaxed about museum security. No glass protecting the paintings, no velvet ropes encouraging people to step back. You could feasibly reach out and touch one quickly without anyone noticing. Compared to the bullet proof glass protecting The Declaration of Independence, I though this was particularly amusing.

Venus de Milo, circa 130-100 BC

Venus de Milo, circa 130-100 BC

Throughout our small portion of time, we saw a lot. Unfortunately, since I didn’t take many pictures, I can’t recall most of exactly what I did and didn’t see. I’m just glad I got to see as much as I did.

We did find this particularly comical:

Taken From google: "Galerie de Vues de la Rome Moderne" by Panini, 1759

Taken From google: “Galerie de Vues de la Rome Moderne” by Panini, 1759

A painting of paintings in a museum in a museum.

We decided to take it a few steps further:

A photo of a picture of a picture of a painting of a museum of paintings.

A photo of a picture of a picture of a painting of a museum of paintings.

Please enjoy this photo of a picture of a picture of a painting of a museum of paintings taken in a museum of paintings on my post about a museum of paintings.

Most of our exploring was random. We chose random corridors and turned down random hallways and overall just looked without an agenda. However, you aren’t allowed to go to The Louvre without seeing Mona Lisa. I think it’s illegal.

Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa

Personally, I didn’t think the dusty painting was very impressive compared to all of the other works around it. Honestly, it didn’t help that Mona Lisa is a much tinier painting than most of the others in the same room, and that they designated an entire wall for it.

I did find it hilarious that there was a massive crowd in front of the painting. I had to take this picture from standing very far back.

All in all, I’m still glad I got to see it! Definitely bucket list worthy.

Advertisements

Leave a comment/question/suggestion

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s